Click Here to visit our Sponsor
The Latest News ! The History of Computing The Magazine Forums Collectors corner Have Fun there ! Buy books and goodies
  Click here to loginLogin Click here to print the pagePrinter ViewClick here to send a link to this page to a friendTell a FriendTell us what you think about this pageRate this PageMistake ? You have mr info ? Click here !Add Info     Search     Click here use the advanced search engine

Commodore

AMIGA 2000
Browse console museumBrowse pong museum









 

Oric Atmos goodies !

see details
Odyssey 2 / Videopac Select Game prompt goodies !

see details
ZX Spectrum goodies !

see details
MZ-700 goodies !

see details
1kb memory only...sorry goodies !

see details
www.old-computers.com logo goodies !

see details
Amstrad CPC-464 goodies !

see details
Space Invaders goodies !

see details
I love my Oric-1 goodies !

see details
Commodore 64 goodies !

see details
Destroy all humanoids ! goodies !

see details
Pixel adventurer goodies !

see details
READY prompt goodies !

see details
Commodore 64 boot screen goodies !

see details
Amiga Workbench goodies !

see details
Space Invaders - Retro Gamer goodies !

see details
Odyssey 2 / Videopac sprites goodies !

see details
Atari ST bomb icons goodies !

see details
Apple II goodies !

see details
Atari ST bee icon goodies !

see details
Horace is not dead goodies !

see details
Commodore VIC-20 goodies !

see details
MSX Retro Gamer goodies !

see details
H.E.R.O. goodies !

see details
Camputers Lynx logo goodies !

see details
Back to the roots goodies !

see details







C > COMMODORE  > C116     


Commodore
C116

The C116 was revealed at the 1984 Summer CES. It was the cheapest Commodore computer ever made.

Bil Herd, the machine''s designer has said, on many occasions, that the original host for the TED was the C116, a $49 machine intended to compete with the Sinclair line of machines.

The resulting design was then twisted by management, to become the 1xx, 2xx, and 3xx machines... 116, 232, 264, 364 etc respectively (the difference between the 264 and 364 being that the 364 had a numeric keypad AND the Magic Voice cartridge built onto the motherboard) ...

The 264 was then taken by management, had productivity software bolted onto it, and it became the Plus-4, a machine with little Commodore 64 compatibility, costing in the same price range as the Commodore 64. A total fail.

The Commodore 16, came LATE in the TED''s development lifecycle, when management decided that they needed to have a replacement for the VIC-20, so they took the VIC-20 cases and keyboards, repainted them, and refactored the TED design to fit in them.

It was sold only in Germany and a few East European countries.

It came comes with 32 KB of ROM, only 16 KB of RAM and without any built-in software. Like the C16, it didn't have a user port.

Commodore's hatred for shift keys finds expression in the very early C116's keyboard layout. This time, they made it even worse and removed the LEFT shift key and placed an Esc key there! Not to mention the Inst/Del key which resided at the SHIFT LOCK key's place. The versions sold later had the Inst/Del key next to the Home/Clear key in the top row next to the function keys, the Esc key where you would want it, and thank God, a left shift key again.

________

Contributors: Thomas Cherryhomes

ShareThis


 

Hi guys, I have a Commodore 116. I purchased it from the US but bought it without a power adaptor. Seems like a rare machine, as you don''t see many on line at all.

          
Monday 23rd December 2013
Richard (Australia)

Guys,

The comment about the C116 being a cut down C16 is _VERY_ wrong.

Bil Herd, the machine''s designer has said, on many occasions, that the original host for the TED _WAS_ the C116, a $49 machine intended to compete with the Sinclair line of machines.

The resulting design was then twisted by management, to become the 1xx, 2xx, and 3xx machines... 116, 232, 264, 364 etc respectively (the difference between the 264 and 364 being that the 364 had a numeric keypad AND the Magic Voice cartridge built onto the motherboard) ...

The 264 was then taken by management, had productivity software bolted onto it, and it became the Plus-4, a machine with little Commodore 64 compatibility, costing in the same price range as the Commodore 64. A total fail.

The Commodore 16, came LATE in the TED''s development lifecycle, when management decided that they needed to have a replacement for the VIC-20, so they took the VIC-20 cases and keyboards, repainted them, and refactored the TED design to fit in them.

          
Sunday 5th December 2010
Thomas Cherryhomes (USA)
LinuxMCE

Some years ago I bought one of these in New Zealand. I was told by the seller that it has been imported by the New Zealand distributer (or maybe Commodore NZ) to evaluate, but it was such rubbish they decided not to sell it here. Only the single unit was ever officially imported. I have subsequently lost the email correspondence about it, so if you have any further info about this particular machine, please get in touch with me: http://www.evil.geek.nz/contact

          
Saturday 28th August 2010
lizardb0y (New Zealand)
Evil.Geek

 

NAME  C116
MANUFACTURER  Commodore
TYPE  Home Computer
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1984
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  Commodore BASIC 3.5 - Built-in machine code monitor (12 commands)
KEYBOARD  Chicklet keyboard, 65 keys with 4 function keys and 4 cursor keys
CPU  7501
SPEED  0.89 MHz or 1.76 MHz
CO-PROCESSOR  VIC-II (video & sound)
RAM  16 KB (12 KB free for user)
ROM  32 KB
TEXT MODES  40 chars. x 25 lines
GRAPHIC MODES  320 x 200 / 320 x 160 (with 5 lines of text) / 160 x 200 / 160 x 160 (with 5 lines of text)
COLOrsc  121 (15 colours x 8 luminances + black)
SOUND  two channels; 4 octaves + white noise
SIZE / WEIGHT  Unknown
I/O PORTS  Tape, Cardridge, Joystick (2), serial, Composite Video, TV
BUILT IN MEDIA  Cassette unit. Provision for 5.25
OS  ROM Based
PRICE  Unknown





Google
 
Web www.old-computersc.com


 

More pictures
Hardware Info
Emulators
Internet Links
Documentations
Mini-Forum

Click here to go to the top of the page   
Contact us | members | about old-computers.com | donate old-systems | FAQ
OLD-COMPUTERS.COM is hosted by - NYI (New York Internet) -