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- There are now 992 computers in the museum -




   LATEST ADDITIONS
OLIVETTI  A5
Olivetti introduced a mainframe about 1960 which was called ELEA, then in 1965 the Programma 101 - which was probably the world's first real desktop computer. Then a little later they introduced the Audiotronic range of "office computers". The first was the A770, which was replaced by the A7. The A5 was the desktop version. The Olivetti Audit 5 or A5 was largely an electro mechanical computer. It printed via a golf ball typewritter mechanism at the astonishing speed of 16 character per second...
TRIUMPH ADLER  TA-1600
The TA 1600 system was introduced in 1983 at the CeBIT (which was only a part of the "Hannover-Messe" by that time). TA showed a few sample applications and the 1600 family in general. Triumph Adler's hardware included also the 1600/20-3 which was supplied with a permanent-swap-HDD-unit. This unit had a memory/storage capacity of 2 x 8 MB (Winchester technology). Triumph Adler said the system (the 1600) will fit the demand of medium-sized businesses, due to the facts that these companies w...
MIDWICH Microcontroller
Called the Midwich Microcontroller, this British computer was developped to provide a small desktop micro capable of running other equipment throug a variety of interface cards. In 1979 an Italian IC manufacturer designed and began to sell a single board micro system that could be expanded to a full system with a VDU, discs, etc. Called the Nanocomputer, it was manufactured by SGS Ates and one of the distributors in the UK was Midwich. The Nano was somewhat expensive and suffered from a numbe...
RADIONIC Model R1001
This is an extremly rare TRS-80 Model 1 clone, based on an other clone: The Komtek 1 (from Germany). It's equiped with a Level II basic and powered by a Zilog Z80 cpu. _________ Contributors : Incog...
BASF 7100
The BASF 7000 systems are professional computers from Germany. They seem to be based on the Microterm II Intelligent Terminal by Digi-Log Systems, Inc. There were several models in the 7000 serie....
PERTEC PCC 2000
PCC 2000 is a professional computer released in 1978. It was designed in 1978 by Pertec, the company which merged with MITS by the end of 1976. The PCC is conceived as a monobloc machine, where the display and two 8" floppy disk drives are built-in the main case. The mechanical keyboard offers separated numeric and editing keypads. The system is powered by an Intel 8085 microprocessor and offers 64 KB RAM. The whole thing was apparently delivered with an extended Basic language, which has...
TERTA TAP-34
TAP 34 is a self design of Terta company from Hungary. Primarily it was designed as a terminal for big computer systems but it was also able to process data alone. The main integrated circuits were assembled in the USSR and in Hungary by Tungsram, but several parts were imported from other countries. The built-in monitor was a DME-28 monochrome CRT made by Orion. This company was famous for its televisions in Hungary and the other KGST countries. The floppy drive attached to the compute...
MCM COMPUTERS  MCM 800
Based on the MCM 70 / 700 (see this entry for more info), the MCM 800 followed in 1976. It was faster, included 16 KB RAM (instead of 8 KB for the 700), and included the ability to drive an external monitor. Among other things, MCM 800s were used in one of the first french industrial network called Gixinet (along with ARCnet). This was a token-bus type network developped by the Gixi company....
IMLAC PDS-1
The Imlac PDS-1 is a graphical minicomputer made by Imlac Corporation (founded in 1968) of Needham, Massachusetts. The PDS-1 debuted in 1970 and is considered to be the predecessor of all later graphical minicomputers and modern computer workstations. The PDS-1 had a built-in display list processor and 4096 16-bit words of core RAM. The PDS-1 used a vector display processor for displaying vector graphics as opposed to the raster graphics of modern computer displays. The PDS-1 was often used with...
COMMODORE  C64 Golden Jubilee
Between 1984 (in the U.S.) and 1986 (in Germany), Commodore International celebrated the 1,000,000 machines sold mark in these respective countries by issuing special "Gold" editions of the Commodore C64. These machines were regular C64 models, except they were Golden-colored and fixed on a commemorative plate. The following information comes from Death Adder : Until December 1986, 1,000,000 Commodore 64s were sold in Germany. On this occasion, Commodore Buromaschinen GmbH (...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
AMSTRAD  PPC 512 / 640
With the Amstrad PPC-512 and 640, Amstrad wanted to make the cheapest portable PC compatible computer, in the same way as the Amstrad PC1512 was for desktop computers. But, despite its pleasant form, this computer suffered due to its poor 9" LCD screen. It had one or two 3.5" 720 KB floppy drives and some versions could also be found with a 10 or 20 MB internal hard disk. If you were tired of the poor LCD screen, you could connect a monochrome or CGA moni...
GRADIENTE Expert Plus
The Gradiente Expert Plus is a Brazilian MSX 1 computer. It is composed of two parts: the main unit and the keyboard. Gradiente is a Brazilian consumer electronic products company. It is not suprising as the unit's design looks like a HI-FI system... Along with the Hot-Bit, the Experts were the only MSX systems available in Brazil. The first model (Expert XP-800) was in fact a clone of the National CF-3000. It is a quite complete MS...
ORIC NOVA 64
The NOVA 64 seems to be a legal copy of the Oric Atmos for the Yugoslavian market. Here is what the Oric FAQ by Jim Groom says : "A Yugoslavian company (believed to be Avtotehna, based in Ljubljana) obtained a licence to make 5000 machines. Machines were made, but whether they were under license or not is not known in any detail. It is thought that they assembled parts shipped from the UK. I have a contact in Yugoslavia who says there were several in his village and about 30 in a schoo...
ZPA IQ-151
The IQ-151 was a Czechoslovakian home computer manufactured by ZPA Novy Bor (Novy Bor being the town where ZPA was based). It was mainly intended for educational purpose and was actually supplied to all types of Czech schools. The main peripheral was a standard cassette recorder, but several modules could be connected to 5 built-in expansion slots: VIDEO (display), BASIC (interpreter), BASIC G (graphic Basic interpreter), GRAFIK (256 x 512 graphics), STAPER (printer), MINIGRAF (plotter)
EDS C64 EDC
We are looking for information about this rare machine made by the German company EDS. It seems that only 320 machines of this type have been sold, mostly in Germany. The inside was composed of a C64 mainboard, a built-in PSU and a dual 5.25" floppy disk drives. The enhanced keyboard had a numeric keypad. ...
PRAVETZ 8D
The Pravetz 8D was a Bulgarian clone of the Oric Atmos featuring a Bulgarian version of the 6502 processor called CM630, 16 KB of ROM and 48 KB of RAM The keyboard was almost the same as the original Atmos version, including a MK key, similar to the CTRL key, a C/L key allowing to display Cyrillic or Latin alphabets, and cursor keys. As in Pravets 82 (etc), the original lowercase characters were replaced by cyrillic characters a...
MICRONIQUE  Victor Lambda
The Victor Lambda is in fact an american computer : the Interact. A french company (based in Toulouse), Lambda Systemes, bought the rights to sell the system in France under its own name in 1980. The Victor Lambda was born......
ATARI  FALCON 030 MicroBox
Few time after the Falcon 030, Atari decided to launch its successor. They worked then on the Falcon030 MicroBox. Basically, it is a Falcon030 in a new case with a full 32bit data bus. (Remember that the Falcon030 has only a 16bit data bus). An other version was planned with a bigger case and three expansion slots. The MicroBoxes CPU were supposed to be upgradable to a 68040. It was never released (How typical!). Only few prototypes were produced, then abandon...
COMMODORE  MAX Machine / Ultimax / VC-10
The Commodore MAX was released after the VIC 20 and at the same time as the C64. It was intended to be Commodore’s low-end offering ($150-180), whereas the C64 was envisioned as a high-end product ($595). The system was very inexpensive and lacked even basic features such a user expansion port. In reality, the MAX was a severely limited C64. Several MAX software titles could actually be run on the C64. Some production mode...
SORD  M23 Mark III
The Sord M23 Mark III was available with 12" green monitor or a 14" color monitor. Despite the M23 featured a cartridge port, all of its important software came on floppies, including the ground-breaking PIPS-III and several BASIC compiler variants developed by Sord and running on their own OS. A lot of good business software and games were written with these. There were later Mark systems released, including a Mark I with the world's first 3.5 inch floppies deployed, and the Mark V with e...

   RANDOM ADVERTS
Advert #2

TIMEX / SINCLAIR
1000

 
M-Series brochure - ...

PANASONIC
JD series

 
Russian advert - pag...

LEMZ
Agat

 
Official flyer (rect...

MYARC
Geneve 9640

 
French picture (apri...

SHARP
MZ 800 - MZ 1500

 
German leaflet #2

SHARP
MZ-3500

 
First U.S. advert (1...

TANDY RADIO SHACK
TRS 80 MODEL I

 
Brochure #5

BAINBRIDGE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, INC.
Dolphin

 
Z-2H 1980 advert

CROMEMCO
Z-2

 
U.S. ad. June 1983

TANDY RADIO SHACK
TRS-80 Model 100 / 102

 
Promotional pict. #1

APF
Imagination Machine

 
US dealer advert

COMMODORE
PET 2001

 
U.S. ad #2 (1982)

NORTHSTAR
Advantage

 
U.S. advert  Apr. 19...

NEC
PC 8801

 
US advert #6 (1980)

ATARI
800

 
French ad (july 1983...

ORIC
ORIC 1

 
UK advert (Apr. 1986...

RESEARCH MACHINES
Nimbus PC

 
U.S. advert (1977) #...

POLYMORPHIC
POLY 88

 
Promotional pict.

HEWLETT PACKARD
HP-85

 
French advertisement

AI ELECTRONICS
ABC 24

 
French ad (dec.1983)

IBM
PC - Model 5150

 
Plus3 advert

ACORN COMPUTER
Electron

 
UK brochure #1

COMMODORE
CBM 700 Series

 
1978 brochure #4

MSI
6800

 

   LATEST COMMENTS
Werner Augusto Roder Kai
7/26/2014
SONY  Hit-Bit 501
Please correct the information about this MSX

1 - in the Keyboard section: It''s HB-501F not HB-75F.
2 - Also Hitachi H2 and Sanyo PHC-34 have built-in tape recorders.

Also add: The A/V output is DIN-6 (non-standard), and it''s carry STEREO audio outputs.

Jack
7/21/2014
DAVID COMPUTER  PROFI 203
I just posted a bunch of information about the dAVID Computer, designed and built in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada in the early 1980''s. However, I got an error from this site when I submitted it. If there''s interest I can try again. - jc

memsom
7/21/2014
BE BeBox
If you really want a BeBox, I would go for the 133Mhz version. The 66Mhz version is too slow to run any version of BeOS very well. I owned a 66 for about 3 years, and it was a sad day when I let it go, but it was more or less useless to me by that point.

Darren
7/18/2014
PIONEER  Palcom PX-7
Hi Craig (in Australia)

I have 1 of the (off loaded) Pioneer PX-7 MSX Computers

Mark
7/18/2014
TOMY  Tutor MK II
There''''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

Mark
7/18/2014
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS  TI 99 / 4A Beige
There''''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

Mark
7/18/2014
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS  TI 99 / 2
There''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

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